Deriving Conclusions From Passages – Verbal Reasoning Questions And Answers

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Deriving Conclusions From Passages – Verbal Reasoning Questions And Answers

1. A study of native born residents in Newland found that two-thirds of the children developed considerable levels of nearsightedness after starting school, while their illiterate parents
and grandparents, who had no opportunity for formal schooling, showed no signs of this disability.

If the above statements are true, which of the following conclusions is most strongly supported by them?
 
 
 
 

2. Although most of the fastest growing jobs in today's economy will require a college degree, many of the new jobs being created-from home health aide to desktop publisher-
require knowledge other than that gained from earning a degree. For workers in those jobs, good basic skills in reading, communigreion, and mathematics play an important role in
getting a job and developing a career.

From the information given above it can be validly concluded that, in today's economy,
 
 
 
 

3. Sally has never received a violation from the Federal Aviation Administration during her 16-year flying career. Sally must be a great pilot.

Which of the following can be said about the reasoning above?
 
 
 
 

4. No national productivity measures are available for underground industries that may exist but remain unreported. On the other hand, at least some industries that are run entirely by
self-employed industrialists are included in national productivity measures.

From the information given above, it can be validly concluded that
 
 
 
 

5. Is it wrong for doctors to lie about their patients' illnesses? Aren't doctors just like any other people we hire to do a job for us? Surely, we would not tolerate not being told the truth about the condition of our automobile from the mechanic we hired to fix it, or the condition of our roof from the carpenter we employed to repair it. Just as these workers would be guilty of violating their good faith contracts with us if they were to do this, doctors who lie to their patients about their illnesses violate these contracts as well, and this is clearly wrong.

The conclusion of the argument is best expressed by which of the following?
 
 
 
 

6. There is more bad news on food front. It now appears certain that there will bea shortfall of about 9 million tonnes in the food production in the current kharif season, which in
turn means five million tonnes less than the production achieved in the last kharif season. However, rice procurement may only be partially affected since West Bengal and Andhra
Pradesh have had sufficient rainfall while Punjab, the mtyor contributor to the central pool is less dependent on rainfall. Still, the overall availability of rice may go down by more
than four million tonnes. There may be worst news ahead. Western countries have well equipped laboratory tests to detect rabies,
 
 
 
 

7. There is more bad news on food front. It now appears certain that there will bea shortfall of about 9 million tonnes in the food production in the current kharif season, which in
turn means five million tonnes less than the production achieved in the last kharif season. However, rice procurement may only be partially affected since West Bengal and Andhra
Pradesh have had sufficient rainfall while Punjab, the mtyor contributor to the central pool is less dependent on rainfall. Still, the overall availability of rice may go down by more
than four million tonnes. There may be worst news ahead. The saliva of the house dogs should be periodically tested for the detection of rabies,
 
 
 
 

8. There is more bad news on food front. It now appears certain that there will bea shortfall of about 9 million tonnes in the food production in the current kharif season, which in
turn means five million tonnes less than the production achieved in the last kharif season. However, rice procurement may only be partially affected since West Bengal and Andhra
Pradesh have had sufficient rainfall while Punjab, the mtyor contributor to the central pool is less dependent on rainfall. Still, the overall availability of rice may go down by more
than four million tonnes. There may be worst news ahead. The bite of rabies-infected animal to a healthy animal definitely results in spread of rabies
 
 
 
 

9. Rabies is a disease transmitted to man and animals through the bite of a rabies- infected animal, most commonly by dogs. It is caused by a virus present in the saliva of the
infected animal which gets deposited in the wound of the bite victim, multiplies and travels towards brain and spinal cord. If not treated, about half of such cases develop rabies.
Symptoms of the disease start one to three months after the bite. Veryfew laboratory teste are available for the diagnosis of rabies in India. Precautionary measures include prompt
washing of the dog bite wound with soap and water. The wound is also treated with cetavion : tincture of iodine or spirit. Rabies can be transmitted from any animal to the other
through open cuts and wounds.
 
 
 
 

10. There is more bad news on food front. It now appears certain that there will bea shortfall of about 9 million tonnes in the food production in the current kharif season, which in
turn means five million tonnes less than the production achieved in the last kharif season. However, rice procurement may only be partially affected since West Bengal and Andhra
Pradesh have had sufficient rainfall while Punjab, the mtyor contributor to the central pool is less dependent on rainfall. Still, the overall availability of rice may go down by more
than four million tonnes. There may be worst news ahead. In the last year, there was a deficit production of rice by five million tonnes.
 
 
 
 

11. The basic thrust, of the Government's policy is to provide price incentives to farmers to make them produce more food. But is a price-incentive system, always efficient in
ensuring incremental yields ? Our contention is that this incentive works only in persuading farmers to shift cultivation from one crop to another depending on which crop is more
profitable at) the given prices. But it would not be a sufficient condition in ensuring incremental output of all crops which is what is required.
 
 
 
 

12. The basic thrust, of the Government's policy is to provide price incentives to farmers to make them produce more food. But is a price-incentive system, always efficient in
ensuring incremental yields ? Our contention is that this incentive works only in persuading farmers to shift cultivation from one crop to another depending on which crop is more
profitable at) the given prices. But it would not be a sufficient condition in ensuring incremental output of all crops which is what is required.

The author is advocating for more yield of various crops.
 
 
 
 

13. The basic thrust, of the Government's policy is to provide price incentives to farmers to make them produce more food. But is a price-incentive system, always efficient in
ensuring incremental yields ? Our contention is that this incentive works only in persuading farmers to shift cultivation from one crop to another depending on which crop is more
profitable at) the given prices. But it would not be a sufficient condition in ensuring incremental output of all crops which is what is required.

Recently there was an agitation by farmers for an increase in procurement price of crops.
 
 
 
 

14. The basic thrust, of the Government's policy is to provide price incentives to farmers to make them produce more food. But is a price-incentive system, always efficient in
ensuring incremental yields ? Our contention is that this incentive works only in persuading farmers to shift cultivation from one crop to another depending on which crop is more
profitable at) the given prices. But it would not be a sufficient condition in ensuring incremental output of all crops which is what is required.

The farmers are not income-conscious.
 
 
 
 

15. The basic thrust, of the Government's policy is to provide price incentives to farmers to make them produce more food. But is a price-incentive system, always efficient in
ensuring incremental yields ? Our contention is that this incentive works only in persuading farmers to shift cultivation from one crop to another depending on which crop is more
profitable at) the given prices. But it would not be a sufficient condition in ensuring incremental output of all crops which is what is required.

The Government is not ready to increase the procurement price of crops.
 
 
 
 

16. In the absence of an integrated sugar-field to sale policy, the Indian sugar industry has become a victim of surplus production and price mismatch of sugarcane and finished sugar. Despite a lower estimated sugar production at around 12.8 million tons for 1996-97 against 16.7 million tons in the previous year, the total availability is put to 20.8 million tons including a carryover stock of 8 million tons from the previous year. Of this, he domestic consumption may not exceed 13.5 million tons. Though the industry could export 10.5 million tons to different countries during 1995-96, this year’s export policy, existing norms and international market conditions may bring down the export quantity to half a million tons.
India need not import sugar during the next few years.
 
 
 
 

17. In the absence of an integrated sugar-field to sale policy, the Indian sugar industry has become a victim of surplus production and price mismatch of sugarcane and finished sugar. Despite a lower estimated sugar production at around 12.8 million tones for 1996-97 against 16.7 million tones in the previous year, the total availability is put to 20.8 million tones including a carryover stock of 8 million tones from the previous year. Of this, the domestic consumption may not exceed 13.5 million tones. Though the industry could export 10.5 million tones to different countries during 1995-96, this year’s export policy, existing norms and international market conditions may bring down the export quantity to half a million tones.

There may be a fall in the sugar price during 1997-98.
 
 
 
 

18. In the absence of an integrated sugar-field to sale policy, the Indian sugar industry has become a victim of surplus production and price mismatch of sugarcane and finished sugar. Despite a lower estimated sugar production at around 12.8 million tones for 1996-97 against 16.7 million tones in the previous year, the total availability is put to 20.8 million tones including a carryover stock of 8 million tones from the previous year. Of this the domestic consumption may not exceed 13.5 million tones. Though the industry could export 10.5 million tones to different countries during 1995-96, this year’s export policy, existing norms and international market conditions may bring down the export quantity to half a million tones.

India’s export policy has made the sugar price non-competitive in the international market.
 
 
 
 

19. In the absence of an integrated sugar-field to sale policy, the Indian sugar industry has become a victim of surplus production and price mismatch of sugarcane and finished sugar. Despite a lower estimated sugar production at around 12.8 million tones for 1996-97 against 16.7 million tones in the previous year, the total availability is put to 20.8 million tones including a carryover stock of 8 million tones from the previous year. Of this the domestic consumption may not exceed 13.5 million tones. Though the industry could export 10.5 million tones to different countries during 1995-96, this year’s export policy, existing norms and international market conditions may bring down the export quantity to half a million tones.
The quantum of current year’s sugar production is close to the envisaged.
 
 
 
 
 

20. In the absence of an integrated sugar-field to sale policy, the Indian sugar industry has become a victim of surplus production and price mismatch of sugarcane and finished sugar. Despite a lower estimated sugar production at around 12.8 million tones for 1996-97 against 16.7 million tones in the previous year, the total availability is put to 20.8 million tones including a carryover stock of 8 million tones from the previous year. Of this the domestic consumption may not exceed 13.5 million tones. Though the industry could export 10.5 million tones to different countries during 1995-96, this year’s export policy, existing norms and international market conditions may bring down the export quantity to half a million tones.
India’s sugar export was the highest in recent times during 1995-96.
 
 
 
 


 

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